Category: Intelligence Process

REVIEW: Strategic Intelligence. Windows Into A Secret World

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By Loch K. Johnson and James J. Wirtz, eds. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing Company, 2004. 473 pages, end of chapter notes, bibliography, charts, tables, index The editors of this anthology have assembled 35 articles on the major functions of the intelligence profession written by intelligence officers, national security journalists, academics, think-tank analysts, novelists, and politicians.

REVIEW: Fixing Intelligence. For a More Secure America

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By Lt. Gen. William E. Odom, US Army, Ret. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2002. 230 pages. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ There are two very important themes running through this book, and they earn the author a solid four stars and a “must read” recommendation. First, the author is correct and compellinging clear when he points out

REVIEW: Paradoxes of Strategic Intelligence. Essays in Honor of Michael I. Handel.

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By Richard K. Betts and Thomas G. Mahnken, eds.  London, UK: Frank Cass, 2003. 210 pages, end-of-chapter notes, index. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ This volume will come as no surprise to those who knew the late Michael Handel, technically a political scientist but more a historian, who was an expert on military intelligence and an authority on the

REVIEW: America’s Strategic Blunders. Intelligence Analysis and National Security Policy, 1936-1991

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By Willard C. Matthias. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2001. 367 pages, footnotes, index. ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Accidentally released as 9/11 brought to the fore painful political questioning about the failure of intelligence analysis and communication breakdown within the United States national security apparatus, Willard C. Matthias’s America’s Strategic Blunders features a red-hot issue

REVIEW: Trust but Verify. Imagery Analysis in the Cold War

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By David T. Lindgren. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 2000. Pp. xiii+222. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ For some reason, books on cryptology apparently sell well. Go to your local Borders and look in the espionage section and you will find half a dozen fairly recent books on code breaking. I find this inexplicable, because numbers are (in my

REVIEW: KEEPING THE EDGE. Managing Defense for the Future

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By Ashton B. Carler and John P. White, eds., MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2001, 326 pages, $24.95. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Keeping the Edge: Managing Defense for the Future is a collection of essays published by the Preventive Defense Project, a research collaboration of the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard and Stanford Universities. Ashton B. Carter, former