Category: Memoir

REVIEW: Decent Interval: An Insider’s Account of Saigon’s Indecent End Told by the CIA’s Chief Strategy Analyst in Vietnam by Frank Snepp

decent interval

Decent Interval: An Insider’s Account of Saigon’s Indecent End Told by the CIA’s Chief Strategy Analyst in Vietnam by Frank Snepp ISBN 0-7006-1213-0 Widely regarded as a classic on the Vietnam War, Decent Interval provides a scathing critique of the CIA’s role in and final departure from that conflict. Still the most detailed and respected

REVIEW: The American Agent. My Life in the CIA

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The American Agent: My Life in the CIA By Richard L Holm, 462pp, St Ermin's Press Richard L Holm features in no indexes in books about the CIA that I could find, apart from Bob Woodward's Veil: The Secret Wars of the CIA. Woodward mentions him as a respected operations officer who once briefed him

REVIEW: A Look Over My Shoulder. A Life in the Central Intelligence Agency

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By Richard Helms, with William Hood. New York, NY: Random House, 2003. 452 pages. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ In the parlance of espionage, the autobiography of America's one-time spymaster, Richard Helms, might best be called a "sleeper agent." For nearly half of the book's 512 pages, Helms — who died in October — assumes the mild-mannered cover of

REVIEW: Spymasters. Ten CIA Officers in Their Own Words

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  Edited by Ralph E. Weber. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, Inc., 1999. 355 pages __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ In one of the ten long interviews that make up Ralph Weber's Spymasters, distinguished intelligence officer Sam Halpern underscores the importance of knowing what has gone before: "I found a bookmark about the second page of the first chapter [of

REVIEW: The Master of Disguise. My Secret Life in the CIA

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By Antonio Mendez. New York City: William Morrow and Company, 1999. 351 pages. Reviewed by Jim Steinmeyer ____________________________________________________________________________________ Magicians love gimmicks. In fact, I think it is this admiration for contraptions—for tricky pieces of apparatus that do this when you push that —which often attracts people to the field of conjuring. The best magicians come