Tag: Eastern Bloc

Former spy Boris Karpichkov shares the dark arts of the KGB

Source: L'Express

Boris Karpichkov is the spy who was left out in the cold, reports the Sunday People. And even in the warmth of a London hotel room a chill goes down my spine as this trained killer’s knuckles jab towards my

Ex-KGB Major: The Russians Tricked Snowden Into Going To Moscow

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Ex-KGB Major Boris Karpichko told Nigel Nelson of The Mirror that spies from Russia’s SVR intelligence service, posing as ­diplomats in Hong Kong, convinced Snowden to fly to Moscow last June. “It was a trick and he fell for it,” Karpichko, who reached the

REVIEW: Stasiland

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By Anna Funder. London, UK: Granta Books, 2003. 288 pages. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ I have a confession to make. I was at first put off by the title of this book.[1] It sounded so reductive, as if one might sum up East

REVIEW: The Stasi Files. East Germany’s Operations Against Britain

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By Anthony Glees. London, UK: Free Press, 2003. 461 pages. ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The East German security police, the notorious Stasi whose reign of terror ended when the Communist system collapsed in 1989, was the offspring of two separate traditions of state

REVIEW: The Stasi. Myth and Reality

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By Mike Dennis. London, UK: Pearson Education Limited, 2003. 269 pages. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The Confused Octopus: The Stasi in East Germany. In The Stasi: Myth and Reality, Mike Dennis investigates, through historical records, the rise, maintenance, and fall of the East

REVIEW: Security Intelligence Services in New Democracies. The Czech Republic, Slovakia and Romania

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By Kieran Williams and Dennis Deletant. London: Palgrave, in association with the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London, 2001. 291 pages Reviewed by John A. Wiant In the early 1990s, following the collapse of communism, US