Tag: Electronic Frontier Foundation

Everyone agrees that NSA reform legislation is needed. So why hasn’t it happened?

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Last year, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world with news of the extent of the National Security Agency‘s surveillance programs. You might have thought that Congress would react by passing legislation to address the issue. But with Congress now on break

Who Is Running Phony Cell Phone Towers Around The Country?

An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

On August 29, Popular Science published a map of interceptor towers, surveillance devices that masquerade as cell phone towers to intercept voice and data transmissions from every cell user in an area. 19 of the interceptors were found in the

NSA spying might have affected U.S. tech giants more than we thought

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Spying by the National Security Agency and increasing demands by the feds for client data continues costing U.S. IT giants billions in lost revenue while also damaging reputations of the American company’s themselves. That’s the assertion by Electronic Frontier Foundation legislative analyst

NSA asked judge to delete ‘classified’ testimony without public awareness

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The National Security Agency worked behind the scenes to remove a section of a court transcript after suspecting one of its lawyers inadvertently disclosed secret information in a court case over alleged illegal surveillance. Has the wall of secrecy protecting

White House and Senate close to agreement on curbing NSA spying

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Even with the start of a month-long congressional recess only two weeks away, lawmakers in the United States Senate may soon vote on a long-awaited surveillance reform bill before heading home for the rest of summer. Sen. Patrick J. Leahy

NSA: Our systems are so complex we can’t stop them from deleting data wanted for lawsuit

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The National Security Agency recently used a novel argument for not holding onto information it collects about users online activity: it’s too complex. The agency is facing a slew of lawsuits over its surveillance programs, many launched after former NSA

Vodafone Privacy Disclosures Seen Spurring Rivals to Follow

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The National Security Agency recently used a novel argument for not holding onto information it collects about users online activity: it’s too complex. The agency is facing a slew of lawsuits over its surveillance programs, many launched after former NSA

Four ways Edward Snowden changed the world – and why the fight’s not over

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Thursday marks one year since the Guardian published the first in a series of eye-opening stories about surveillance based on documents provided by Edward Snowden. The events in the 52 weeks since have proven him to be the most significant

Schneier: ‘Most of the world is under surveillance’

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Bruce Schneier ( @Bruce_Schneier) is an internationally renowned security technologist. He helped the Guardian analyze top-secret NSA documents leaked by Edward Snowden. Schneier is a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School, a program

EFF denounces NSA defenders’ PRISM claims

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CIVIL RIGHTS GROUP the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has warned defenders of the US National Security Agency (NSA) to stop making excuses and tell the truth. It said that NSA defenders have repeated five ‘facts’ that are not true in

The Government Releases Key Documents Showing NSA Privacy Violations

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Key rulings from the government's secret surveillance court detailing tens of thousands violations of the Fourth Amendment and the NSA's response will shortly be made public by the Director of National Intelligence, following a lawsuit from the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Court OKs immunity for telecoms in U.S. wiretap case

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SAN FRANCISCO — A U.S. appeals court on Thursday said a 2008 law granting telecommunications companies legal immunity for helping the National Security Agency with an email and telephone eavesdropping program is constitutional. The case had consolidated 33 lawsuits filed